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    • Info BCSP

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        • In particular, the project aims to develop specific recommendations designed to bring local regulations into line with international standards and best practices. In addition, the project seeks to provide a framework for capacity building,national and regional dialogue among relevant actors (including interested actors from within governments, civil society and private enterprise) on the best ways to improve both regulatory and self-regulatory tools.  A final goal of the project is to develop a set of general conclusions about the specific needs of post-conflict and transition countries relating to PSCs. In particular, these conclusions will focus on the challenges such states face and the regulatory and sequencing approach that is best suited to their needs.

          As private security companies (PSCs) grow in size and take over more and more security services that were previously provided by state actors, their impact on a country’s security, on democracy, rule of law and human rights becomes increasingly significant. As past research has shown, especially in transition countries in Eastern Europe, PSCs can both alleviate and create insecurity and their activities can infringe citizens’ rights. In most Eastern European countries regulatory frameworks have been introduced but there is a need to examine how well they function, how tailored they are to the country’s specific challenges, how they are being implemented. Legislators, the executive and oversight bodies in the Western Balkans are still becoming aware of the importance of regulating and overseeing PSCs.

          This project aims to facilitate an informed discussion on improving PSC regulation by proposing an exhaustive study into the state of play of PSC regulation in three Western Balkan countries and Bulgaria and propose targeted policy recommendations based on international standards and best practices.

          Partners in this project are: Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF), the Institute for Democracy and Mediation (IDM), the Kosovar Center for Security Studies (KCSS), the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP) and the Center for the Study of Democracy (CSD). This project will be realized with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.
        • Tags: Western Balkans, private security, private security companies, privatisation of security
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