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          The national parliament of Republic of Serbia adopted the set of laws for regulating the defense and security of Serbia. Serbian Parliament has also adopted several strategic documents - National Security Strategy, Strategy of Defense and the National Strategy on the fight against Organized Crime. By adopting aforementioned laws and strategies, Serbia has finalized the first generation of security sector reform. The remaining laws to be adopted are the ones referring to the new law on BIA (the Security Intelligence Agency) and law on private security.

          However, despite the fact that these documents will have the positive influence on the overall security sector, it is important to mention that certain solutions have caused the great public concern. For example, Article 14a Law on amendments of Serbian Army Law banes military professionals from participating in the activities of organizations which deal with the reformation of defense system and Serbian Army. In addition, in the process of creating these regulations, the attempt of propounders, to lower the standards of democratic civilian control, established by the previous laws, was obvious.

          However, pressured by the public, many problematic resolutions, drafted in laws, were removed from the proposal. Thus, they did not appear in the adopted laws. Finally, it is important to mention that during the process of adopting these documents, there was a tendency of state institutions to avoid public disputes about these laws.

          Centre’s researchers present the readers with the key solutions of the newly-adopted documents as well as with their questionable parts. Further, various state institutions and civil organizations organized public disputes on those documents. Those disputes and their analyses are also presented here. Further, Adel Abusara presents the readers with the European Union Report on the Western Balkans progress in 2009, in which the progress of security reformations in Serbia in 2009 was evaluated.

          Eventually, in this issue the readers are introduced to a number of other texts referring to topics other than the main one. Such as Adel Abusara and Marko Savković’s text on the announcement of forming the centre for the emergency situations in Niš, as well as the text, by Nataša Hroneska, on the Macedonian Law of Energetic. Also, there is a text on the Swiss neutrality signed by Véronique Panchaud, as well as Bard Knudsen’s text on enforcing the competency of Norway on the international security issues.

          Finally, in this issue you can read presentation of Kieron O’Haraa and Nigel Shadbolt’s The Spy in the Coffee Machine - The End of Privacy as We Know it, by Igor Novaković. The authors of the book reveal the ways in which the citizens’ privacy is violated by the modern technology, hence they warn us that it can all lead to brave new "digital"world.

          Predrag Petrović, Editor of the 15th issue

        • Tags: secrecy, data, Law, security services, military intelligence, multinational, peace support operations, Serbian Army, civil service, organised crime, strategy, European Union, media reporting, energetic security, Macedonia, neutrality, emergency centre
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