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          • Year: 2014
          • Security Council Resolution 1325: Civil Society Monitoring Report 2014

          • BCSP Researcher Maja Bjelos is co-author of the independent report on achievements in the implementation of UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security in Serbia in 2014. Analysis of the results was based on 11 indicators, with a focus on the assessment of women's participation, prevention and protection from violence and the promotion of gender perspective. The authors have offered specific recommendations to institutions, the United Nations and civil society organizations.

        • While there has been some progress in terms of democratic governance reform, the changes that took place in the government since 2012 affected women’s rights in general. Lack of democratic continuity can negatively influence the implementation of the policies and practices that are currently in place, and which should be strengthened further.

          In terms of women’s participation in decision-making, there has been little progress. Women constitute less than 30 percent of the newly elected government. Their participation is particularly weak in the security sector, and in peacekeeping missions. The main challenges to women’s participation are the patriarchal stereotypes about women, resulting in their assignment to traditionally “female” committees and positions, and the role of women as primarily responsible for their households, which makes it difficult for them to leave their family in order to participate in a peacekeeping mission. 

          There has been some progress with regards to women’s participation, in particular in the legislature. Women also hold some high-profile posts, such as the Speaker of the Parliament, the President of the Constitutional Court and the Chief Negotiators in the EU Accession talks. However, this progress is not reflected in a greater representation of women’s issues, or greater gender equality. This is largely due to the fact that the women in power often simply follow their party line. Women’s rights activists and CSOs are marginalized. That was the case even in the planning and implementation of the NAP, since they were admitted to the official process in a limited, advisory role. The funds given to women’s organizations by the government are also very small. The persisting problem in Serbia is the failure to deliver justice to the victims of SGBV that took place during the conflict. Prosecution of war crimes, including SGBV crimes, in Serbia has been very slow and unsatisfactory, and there is no data available on the number and progress of SGBV prosecutions before the War Crimes panel of the Higher Court in Belgrade. Moreover, there has been no progress on delivering reparations to SGBV victims.

          Despite the fact that Serbia has signed and ratified numerous international conventions on human rights, and adopted national laws and strategies for gender equality and against gender-based violence, the implementation of these strategies is very poor, and the problems they seek to address still persist. The government needs to take steps to amend this situation. 

        • Tags: UNSCR 1325, UN Resolution 1325, women, peace, Security, gender and security
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