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        • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Jelena Pejic Nikic, Katarina Djokic, Marija Ignjatijevic, Sasa Djordjevic
          • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy

          • This analysis by the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP) concludes that during the 52 days it spent in a state of emergency, Serbia failed the test of democracy, thanks to a series of failings and irregularities in the conduct and control of the security sector.

        • The Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical Pandemic
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Maja Bjelos, Marko Drajić
          • The Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical Pandemic

          • Masks have slipped and the interests of Serbia’s foreign policy were exposed during the COVID-19 pandemic. These interests are not based on the principles of common goods, but on mechanism for preserving the existing internal order. This is one of the conclusions in the foreign policy analysis ...

        • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
          • Publications

          • Autor: Sasa Djordjevic
          • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings

          • Did organized crime groups continue with their activity at the time of Coronavirus, which trends in the criminal activities in the Western Balkans can be noticed in the first six weeks of the pandemic and which scenarios can be envisaged for the future, analyzed BCSP Researcher Sasa Djordjevic.

        • Pandemic of geopolitics
          • Publications

          • Autor: Igor Bandovic
          • Pandemic of geopolitics

          • How does the COVIDー19 pandemic influence Serbia's foreign policy - read in the op-ed writen by BCSP Director Igor Bandovic for the weekly "Vreme".

        • Why Are People Leaving the Serbian Defence System?
          • Publications

          • Autor: Katarina Djokic, Marija Ignjatijevic
          • Why Are People Leaving the Serbian Defence System?

          • BCSP Researchers Katarina Djokic and Marija Ignjatijevic analysed the reasons for employees leaving the Serbian defence system and gave recommendations that could overturn this negative trend.

        The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing DemocracyThe Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical PandemicCrime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early FindingsPandemic of geopoliticsWhy Are People Leaving the Serbian Defence System?
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        • BCSP Executive Director Predrag Petrović and BCSP Researcher Marko Milošević are the authors of the Chapter related to the current state of the Serbian private security sector. They analyzed extensive information on the Serbian private security sector from both official documents and interviews.

          The private security sector in Serbia employs between forty and fifty thousand people, matching the number of police officers and exceeding the number of Serbian Armed Forces personnel by almost a third. While the private security sector in one of the region’s stronger economies is certainly big, the development of PSCs in Serbia was held back by important factors such as conflict and sanctions, economic crises and overall politicisation of the security sector. The Serbian case is also exceptional in that, until recently, the country lacked a specific law on private security and the sector developed for more than 20 years without a clear legal framework.

          The publication has provided an in-depth insight into the development and state of play of the private security sector in the target countries in Southeast Europe. Besides the historical developments that shaped the industry, and its particular characteristics, an overview of the unique legislative frameworks and regulatory systems was also given. These case studies have a number of similarities in terms of recent historical and political changes. At the same time, however, each has their own particularities due to a variety factors relating to politics, war, or economic conjunctures. The authors examine when and how the first private security companies developed and whether and how PSCs, their clients, and other factors such as relevant legislation determined the services private security offers today, and which companies were established/have survived in the market. The studies look into the economic importance of private security especially as a source of employment. 

          This publication addresses a number of important questions: who are the people who work for PSCs, what is their level of expertise and professionalism and what are their working conditions? How important are (political) relationships for the success of a PSC and do domestic political considerations have an impact on which PSC receives contracts and how well they work? How is quality defined and enforced by both PSCs and their clients, especially public sector clients? Finally, do PSCs and state security providers coordinate, cooperate or compete with each other?

          The contributions contained in this volume have shown that in Albania, Bulgaria, Kosovo and Serbia, the private security industry is large, and growing, with the ratio between private security and police often approaching or surpassing parity. Still, the provision of citizens’ security is one of the most fundamental functions of the state. The democratic state has a duty to provide security that is effective, transparent and accountable to its citizens. The state is seen by most as the only legitimate provider of that security. However, the extent to which private security is used, not just by private entities but also by the state itself, shows that the sector serves an important function. In the countries under research, states have, in the transition to market economy, gradually abandoned their previously absolute monopoly on security provision - leaving a gap for PSCs to fill.

          The project Private Security Research Collaboration Southeast Europe (PSRC) represents a wholly collaborative venture between Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces DCAF and four research institutions: the Centre for the Study of Democracy (CSD), the Institute for Democracy and Mediation (IDM), the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP) and the Kosovar Centre for Security Studies (KCSS). The publication has been made possible by the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF). The views expressed in this volume are those of the authors alone and do not in any way represent the views of the institutions or their representatives involved in this project.

        • Tags: private security, private security companies, privatisation of security, Western Balkans
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