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        • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Marko Drajić
          • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy

          • Hungary is currently Serbia’s closest international partner. Bilateral relations between the two countries are no longer marred by any disputes and their political and economic interests increasingly coincide. The values underpinning the administrations of both countries have converged to ...

        • The Security Sector in a Captured State
          • Publications

          • Autor:
          • The Security Sector in a Captured State

          • Report on state capture in Serbia is BCSP genuine and pioneering work aiming to document and deconstruct ongoing process of state capture in the security sector through presentation of mechanisms, actors and consequences of this process.

        • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Jelena Pejic Nikic, Katarina Djokic, Marija Ignjatijevic, Sasa Djordjevic
          • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy

          • This analysis by the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP) concludes that during the 52 days it spent in a state of emergency, Serbia failed the test of democracy, thanks to a series of failings and irregularities in the conduct and control of the security sector.

        • The Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical Pandemic
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Maja Bjelos, Marko Drajić
          • The Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical Pandemic

          • Masks have slipped and the interests of Serbia’s foreign policy were exposed during the COVID-19 pandemic. These interests are not based on the principles of common goods, but on mechanism for preserving the existing internal order. This is one of the conclusions in the foreign policy analysis ...

        • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
          • Publications

          • Autor: Sasa Djordjevic
          • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings

          • Did organized crime groups continue with their activity at the time of Coronavirus, which trends in the criminal activities in the Western Balkans can be noticed in the first six weeks of the pandemic and which scenarios can be envisaged for the future, analyzed BCSP Researcher Sasa Djordjevic.

        Serbia and Hungary: Hammering DemocracyThe Security Sector in a Captured StateThe Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing DemocracyThe Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical PandemicCrime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
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          • Year: 2017
          • The Citizens’ Opinion of the Police in Serbia - 2017

          • More than half of the population in Serbia (56%) showed trust in the police. Over the last three years, a steady yet small increase in the level of trust in the police has been observed. However, it is still below the global average of 60-90%.These are the main findings of a public opinion survey conducted within the framework of the regional network of civil society organizations POINTPULSE.

        • An analysis of the results of a public opinion survey indicates that the citizens of Serbia are aware of many problems that are present in the police, from widespread corruption and politicization to the lack of professional behavior.

          Although there are problems and citizens feel they are very widespread, this does not significantly affect the level of trust in this institution.

          The perception of corruption in the police has been reduced by 4% compared to 2016, but still only one out of 25 citizens of Serbia think that there is no corruption in the policeis institution, while two of the three respondents (68%) believe that the police are severely corrupt. Citizens see traffic police as the most corrupt.

          The probability that a citizen of Serbia will report corruption in the police is extremely small. Almost half are not willing to report a corruption case, whether they are filing it anonymously or asking for personal information. Only a quarter of citizens (26%) would report corruption if they needed to leave their personal data, while one in three (35%) would be willing to do it anonymously.

          Every other citizen (58%) thinks that the police are least working in the service of citizens, and one out of three respondents (37%) believes that the police mainly works in the service of citizens. Three out of four citizens of Serbia (70%) believe that politics has an excessive influence on the operational work of the police.

          Citizens state that personal, friendly and faliliar connections are the main road to employment in the police, followed by political connections and public vacancies just in the third place.

          The first citizen's associations to the male police officers are arrogance or cruelty, and then corruption. They see female police officers as kind and beautiful, suggesting that, despite the fact that women form a significant part of the police since 2000, gender prejudices have a significant impact on the police work experience.

          You can see the complete findings of the police perception survey in Serbia on this link.


           

        • Tags: police, corruption in police, Western Balkans, POINTPULSE, public opinion, citizens, Sasa Djordjevic, Bojan Elek
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