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        • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Marko Drajić
          • Serbia and Hungary: Hammering Democracy

          • Hungary is currently Serbia’s closest international partner. Bilateral relations between the two countries are no longer marred by any disputes and their political and economic interests increasingly coincide. The values underpinning the administrations of both countries have converged to ...

        • The Security Sector in a Captured State
          • Publications

          • Autor:
          • The Security Sector in a Captured State

          • Report on state capture in Serbia is BCSP genuine and pioneering work aiming to document and deconstruct ongoing process of state capture in the security sector through presentation of mechanisms, actors and consequences of this process.

        • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Jelena Pejic Nikic, Katarina Djokic, Marija Ignjatijevic, Sasa Djordjevic
          • The Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing Democracy

          • This analysis by the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP) concludes that during the 52 days it spent in a state of emergency, Serbia failed the test of democracy, thanks to a series of failings and irregularities in the conduct and control of the security sector.

        • The Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical Pandemic
          • Publications

          • Autor: Isidora Stakic, Maja Bjelos, Marko Drajić
          • The Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical Pandemic

          • Masks have slipped and the interests of Serbia’s foreign policy were exposed during the COVID-19 pandemic. These interests are not based on the principles of common goods, but on mechanism for preserving the existing internal order. This is one of the conclusions in the foreign policy analysis ...

        • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
          • Publications

          • Autor: Sasa Djordjevic
          • Crime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings

          • Did organized crime groups continue with their activity at the time of Coronavirus, which trends in the criminal activities in the Western Balkans can be noticed in the first six weeks of the pandemic and which scenarios can be envisaged for the future, analyzed BCSP Researcher Sasa Djordjevic.

        Serbia and Hungary: Hammering DemocracyThe Security Sector in a Captured StateThe Security Sector in the State of Emergency: Testing DemocracyThe Masks Have Slipped: Serbia in a Geopolitical PandemicCrime in the Western Balkans Six at the Time of Coronavirus: Early Findings
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        • At a time when corruption is rising in Serbia, the number of professional killings by organized crime groups is growing, extremism and nationalism are on the rise, and many scandals that occupy the media remain without an epilogue, the Security Information Agency (BIA) is fighting internal enemies and as the biggest threat to Serbia’s security highlights one part of the civil society.

           

           

           

           

          Contrary to the expectations of the general and professional public, there has been no comprehensive reform of the security sector in Serbia, including security services. Since democratic changes in Serbia in year 2000, there has been a partial and inconsistent reform of the security services and the security-intelligence sector, guided by the wishes and ambitions of the strongest political leaders to control the work of the security services, and not by the desire to make the security services one of the bases for protecting the democratic order proclaimed in the first article of the Serbian Constitution.

           

          The never-ending client relationships between security services and politicians in power have only strengthened, and today are an almost more important regulator of the relationship between security services and politics than laws and the Constitution. Therefore, it is not surprising that security services in Serbia today are more of a threat to the democratic order than serving the function of protecting it.

           

          In the analysis, find out more about how seemingly unrelated "affairs" indicate a trend of abuse of security services with an aim of capturing the state.

           

          The analysis is part of a larger body of work dealing with the flows and mechanisms of the capture of security services in Serbia by political authorities, from 2006 to the present, which will be published by the end of 2019. The paper will describe how the (re)arrangement of the security-intelligence sector after the restoration of Serbia's independence created the preconditions for complete capture of security services. Particular attention will also be paid to legal deficiencies that seemed less important at the time, but later proved to be important in the political instrumentalization of the security-intelligence sector. It will also analyse the way in which the ruling party has collapsed the oversight and control mechanisms of the security services, removing obstacles to their full instrumentalization. It will also show how the ruling party uses the security-intelligence sector for personal and party purposes, including for dealing with critics of the government, through concrete examples.

        • Tags: security services, bia, state capture, Predrag Petrović
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