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          "Sourcebook on Security Sector Reform", which was published by the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of the Armed Forces and the Centre for Civil-Military Relations, is referred to the professors and students who deal with the reform of security and defense sector. In the Preface of the book, DCAF Deputy Director Philipp Fluri pointed out that the security sector, among all of the sectors of public policy, has the historically proven one of the most resistant to the public input. The right of the state to restrict certain fundamental human rights, according to the legitimate reasons for protection of the national security and public order, is recognised even in the international law. Also, the security reasons pose certain constraints on the types and amount of information which is released by the security sector institutions to the public. "States have also used reasons of national security as a justification for withholding information and avoiding accountability. Official secrecy, justified on the grounds of the national security, has been used to avoid political embarrassment and to cover up corruption or gross mismanagement of public affairs", Fluri pointed out. The traditional secrecy and exclusiveness of the security domain has tended to constrain transparency, accountability and oversight of this most important sector.

          The editors of this edition, Dr. Philipp Fluri and Prof. Dr. Miroslav Hadžić, divided this Sourcebook on six chapters. In the Introduction, Professor Dr. Miroslav Hadžić analyses the concept of security sector reform, while Dr. Timothy Edmunds is focused on the implementation of this concept. The chapter named Democratic civilian control of Armed Forces contains the papers of Simon Lunn (Democratic civilian control of Armed Forces in principle and practice), Ian Leigh (National legal dimension of the democratic control of the security: values and standards in developed democracies) and Owen Greene (International standards and obligations: norms and criteria for DCAF in the EU, OSCE and OECD Areas). Hans Born and Philipp Fluri wrote about the Parliamentary dimension (Oversight and Guidance: The relevance of parliamentary oversight for the security sector and its reform), while Born particularly wrote about the learning from the best practices of parliamentary oversight of the security sector. The chapter named Democratic accountability of the security apparatus contains the Gerhard Kǘmmel's paper (Civilian control of the multinational missions: responsibility shared or diffused?). The fourth chapter, Civil Society, contains the papers of Marina Caparini (Civil society and democratic oversight of the security sector: A preliminary investigation), Johanna Mendelsohn Forman (Promoting civil society in good governance: lessons from the security sector), hereon Michael Pugh (Civil society and security sector: Security sector reform is too serious business to be left to soldiers) and also Dušan Reljić (Civil society, mass media and democracy in postcommunist countries). "The security sector: Institutional democratic control issues" is the title of the last chapter, which is divided on three parts. The first part, about police, contains the paper which is prepared by Marina Caparini and Otwin Marenin (Reform and progress in the policing systems of Central and Eastern European countries), as so the paper of Bogoljub Milosavljević (Reform of the police and security service in Serbia and Montenegro: Attained results or betrayed expectations). Hans Born and Peter Gill wrote about the intelligence services (Democratic and parliamentary oversight of the intelligence services: Best practises and procedures, Democratic and parliamentary accountability of the intelligence services after September 11th), while Alice Hills wrote about border security (Border control services and security sector reform)

        • Tags: SSR, reform, Security sector, democracy, democratisation, democratic control, civil control, armed forces, standards, control, surveillance
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