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          This issue of the Security of the West Balkans is dedicated to different dimensions of complexity inferred by the concept of multinational operations (MNO). The first text deals with the empirical research of the capacity of Serbia’s defence forces for participation in multinational operations. The results of the research, based on the interviews with mission participants and decision-makers, reveal the scope and obstacles as well as the potential benefits of the participation in multinational operations.

          The new law provides for various forms of participation and we tried to describe them in this issue. Adel Abusara analises traditional operations under the UN mandate and elaborates on their evolution in the post-cold war era. On the other hand, the text written by Igor Novakovic looks at the complexity and delicacy of NATO missions which began to be organised after the threat, in response to which NATO was established in the first place, had disappeared - the conflict with the Warsaw Pact countries. The problematic concept of the EU security policy is presented in the text dealing with the peace-supporting policy as a specific form of engagement under the mandate of this organisation.

          The participation of the ’’Coalition of the Willing’’ in the war in Iraq in 2003 gives an insight into the arguments for a multinational military operation conducted without the mandate of international organisations and military alliances, which is a perspective on the MNO important enough to be represented in this issue.

          This specific aspect of the security sector reform, which was put in the legal framework in the autumn of 2009, coincides in time with the profesionalisation of the military. For this reason, the law also regulates the relation between the conscript army and the peacekeeping operations. In order to provide the reader with the insight into a similar practice, the text on Bundeswehr - German armed forces, deals with the evolution of the state’s conscript army military engagement outside its borders and the heritage of conflicts. The author looked at the problems related to the armed forces and the debate in German society on the participation of its armed forces outside the state borders. The author Gorana Odanovic, and with regard to the decade of the UN Resolution 1325, provides arguments for a broader participation of women in peacekeeping operations.

          The last text endeavours to explain the connection between human security and humanitarian interventions through the ’’responsibility to protect’’ concept and examines the potential implications for the sovereignity of the states if this concept were fully applied. As the fight against terrorism is one of the possible forms of engagement in MNOs approved by this law, we decided to close this issue with the review of Phillip Heymann’s book Terrorism, Freedom and Security: Winning without War and the conclusion that the fight against terrorism could not turn into a permanent state nor could the entire world be divided into friends and enemies.

        • Tags: operations, peace support operations, multinational, United nations, European Union, peace, peace missions, intervention, international organisations
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