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          • Year: 2009
          • Security-Intelligence Services in the Republic of Serbia 2000-2008

          • There are three organisations in Serbia with these responsibilities; the Security-Information Agency (SIA), the Military Security Agency (MSA) and the Military Intelligence Agency (MoI). The SIA is directly subordinated to the government and has the status of a special republic organisation, while both the MSA and MoI are organisational units (administrative bodies) within the Ministry of Defence (MoD) subordinated to the defence minister, and thus also to the government.

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          The functions of the intelligence services are specified by positive legal regulations and include the usual intelligence activities: 1. The collection and analysis of data relevant for national security, defence and protection of economic, foreign policy and other interests ofthe country, and: 2. Submission of this information to political decision makers, law enforcement and other competent state bodies. In addition, the SIA and MSA also havespecific security tasks aimed at uncovering, preventing and documenting threats to the constitutional order, national security and democratic values in society. This primarily refers to terrorist activities and armed rebellions, forms of organised crime, criminal offences against the constitutional order and state security, crimes against humanity and other goodsprotected by international law and crimes against the Serbian Armed Forces. The SIA and MSA also engage in counter-intelligence to uncover (and prevent) the activities of foreign intelligence services and protect domestic institutions. None of the intelligence services has legal powers to plan or carry out secret operations abroad, for the purpose of achieving Serbia’s foreign policy objectives or protecting the country’s national interests. Likewise, they have no control over domestic political and ideological dissent, although under the communist regime and during the 1990s the intelligence services had the hallmarks of a political police.

        • Tags: yearbook, security sector reform, Serbia, research, intelligence services, Bogoljub Milosavljević, Predrag Petrović
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