•  
    • Info BCSP

    • Sign up to receive our e-bulletin.
    •  
    •  
    • Find publications, analysis and documents in our unique resource base available to all visitors of BCSP web site.
      Advance search
    •  
    •  
    •  
     
    •  
          • Year: 2009
          • Concept of Security Sector Reform

          • Since it emerged from the donor and academic communities in the 1990s, the concept of Security Sector Reform (SSR) has been through numerous transformations. SSR can be defined as "the process through which security sector actors adapt to the political and organizational demands of transformation." The aim of SSR is "the efficient and effective provision of state and human security within a framework of democratic governance."

        •  

          This definition of SSR has five main elements. First, efficiency which can be seen as the match between achieved results and means. Second, effectivenesscan be defined as harmony between aims and achieved outcomes. Third, human security refers to freedom from fear and protection of human rights. Human security has two further aspects: freedom from chronic threats, such as murder, hunger, illness and repres-sion; and protection from sudden and damaging disruptions in all aspects of life, either at home, in work or in the community. Fourth, national security is defined as the preservation of territorial integrity, national independence and sovereignty, and the political stability of government institutions. Fifth, democratic governance within the concept of SSR refers to legitimacy, representativeness, transparency, participativeness (participation of citizens), legality and account-ability in the governing of the security sector. Thus, given the criteria of democratic governance SSR is not an easy, simple technical process of the reorganisation of the security sector. The concept of SSR also incorporates the values of liberal democracy and the efforts invested in the adoption of those values.

        • Tags: yearbook, security sector reform, Serbia, research, Filip Ejdus
    •  
    • Post a comment

    •  
    •  
    • See all comments

    •  
    •