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    • There is no system of internal control of the police in Serbia

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    • Date: 27 September 2016

      The challenges of the current system of control of police work were the topic of a panel discussion organized by the OSCE Mission to Serbia on 27 September 2016 in hotel Metropol.

      BCSP researcher Sasa Djordjevic has contributed to the debate.

      "In Serbia, there is no system of internal control of the police, because a system implies a set of organizational units that function as a harmonious whole to achieve a common goal. In practice, there are five different organizational units of the MOI internal control whose responsibilities are not clearly divided and whose work is not coordinated. It is necessary to regulate relations between the internal controllers in the Ministry or combine all responsibilities of internal control in one organizational unit", warns Djordjevic.

      He cited a comprehensive report on work, which clearly lists the results and problems, and which was published for the first time in 10 years since the establishment of the Sector, as progress.

      However, in Serbia there is still a high perception of corruption in the police and citizens still do not recognize the Department of internal control as their first choice for reporting cases of corruption.

      "According to the latest research by BCSP, only 3 percent of Serbian citizens think that corruption in the police force does not exist. In such an environment, it is important that a strong system of internal control that can fix such a bad image of corrupt police officers exsists, "said Djordjevic.

      Other speakers at the event were Mauricio Salustro, senior legal adviser at the OSCE Mission to Serbia, Jim Costello, an international expert, Milos Oparnica, Assistant Minister and Head of the Internal Affairs Sector and Milos Jankovic, Deputy Ombudsman.

      Other participants in this discussion were Dragoljub Djordjevic, President of the Bar Association of Serbia, Lazar Ranitovic, president of the Union of Serbian Police, Veljko Mijailovic, president of Police Union of Serbia, Nikola Kitarovic, Administrative Court judge and a member of the Board of Judges’ Association of Serbia, and Nikola Kovacevic from Belgrade Center for Human rights.

      Report was translated by BCSP Intern Andrijana Gavrilovic.

       
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